Food

 

 

The Hunger Games: Programming for the Palate

celebrated chefs

The authenticity of reality shows is debatable, but one thing’s for sure, the tastiest of the lot, that is, food shows are the real deal (or at least we’d like to believe.) You don’t have to be a sous-chef like Monica Geller, to tell your parsley from coriander, because as viewers, we have pseudo- Phds from the great prestigious University of the Food Network.

It’s remarkable how something we only see and cannot taste, all thanks to the screen that divides us from reel and real, wakes our taste buds from hibernation. What’s even more remarkable is how like a jack in the box we pop up from the comfy seat to run to the kitchen to replicate what we saw.

If the private kitchens of sultry Nigella Lawson or charming Jamie Oliver don’t appeal to you, then there are a host of shows served à la carte that just might appetize you. Whether it’s the chatty Brits cooking for each other on Come Dine With Me or Anthony Bourdain sojourning through the by lanes of  almost every corner of the world, no one can deny indulging in at least one cooking show.

Maybe you’re one of those overly manly men and cookery shows aren’te exactly what you’re looking for, then what you need is Youtube’s Epic Meal Time or Travel Channel’s Man vs Food. This overly manly list wouldn’t be complete without celebrated chef Gordon Ramsay’s Hell’s Kitchen, where testosterone is served on the platter.

Or perhaps if oriental cuisine tantalizes your taste buds then you need to catch the, “beautiful, beautiful” cooking of Kylie Kwong or funny man Bobby Chinn of World Café Asia. Only after mentioning Martin Yan, famous for Yan Can Cook, a show that aired in the 80s, can this oriental list be completed.

There’s nothing like working up an appetite than after watching the cooking reality shows like Iron Chef and Top Chef, where contestants are in a constant knock out battle. Similarly, there is the Australian version of Masterchef, with the lovable trio of Gary MehiganGeorge Calombaris and Matt Preston playing the role of hosts while judging the show as well. And as if all the cooking in the show didn’t render yourself ashamed of your culinary skills, they made Junior Master Chef with kids between the age of 8- 12 years. Let the hunger games begin!

Bon appétit…

By Nicole Xavier

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